Carnitine

Carnitine is a vitamin-like compound with a structure similar to an amino acid. It is found in food, particularly in meat and dairy products, and can also be made by the body from the amino acid, lysine.

What it does in the body

Carnitine is essential for fat metabolism as it transports fatty acids into the mitochondria, where they are 'burned' to release energy for body functions. Carnitine thus increases the use of fat as an energy source.

CarnitineDeficiency

Carnitine deficiency may occur due to genetic defects, reduced absorption, dietary deficiency of precursors, and increased requirements due to stress, medication use or disease.

Supplements

Only the L-carnitine form should be used as the D form of carnitine may cause adverse side effects. L-carnitine is available in several different forms including L-propionylcarnitine andL-acetylcarnitine. See Carnitine supplements

Interactions with other nutrients

Vitamin C, niacin and vitamin B6 are required for carnitine synthesis from lysine. Carnitine may work with coenzyme Q10. Choline supplementation seems to reduce urinary excretion of carnitine.

Cautions

Carnitine is not recommended in people with active liver or kidney disease, or with diabetes.

 
 
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Carnitine
Carnitine supplements

 


 

Other Nutrients:

Essential fatty acids
Choline
Inositol
Para-aminobenzoic acid
Laetrile
Pangamic acid
Coenzyme Q10
Amino acids
Flavonoids
Lipoic acid
Carnitine
Melatonin
Glucosamine
Chitosan
Shark cartilage
Digestive support
Betaine hydrochloride
Digestive enzymes
Probiotics
Fiber supplements
Algae