Molybdenum

Essential for                                                                                           

reactions involving the waste products of protein metabolism
iron utilisation
carbohydrate metabolism
alcohol and sulfite detoxification

MolybdenumAbsorption and metabolism

As much as 88 to 93 per cent of dietary intake is absorbed.

Deficiency

Deficiency is rare and has only been seen in people who are on long-term tube or intravenous feeding or who have a rare genetic inability to use molybdenum. Symptoms include rapid heartbeat and breathing, headache, night blindness, anemia, mental distur- bance, nausea and vomiting.

Sources

Good sources of molybdenum include milk, beans, bread, liver and cereals. The molybdenum content of food varies with the location in which the food is grown. The table on page 285 can be used as a guide.

Daily recommended dietary intakes

An estimated safe and adequate intake is 75 to 250 mcg per day.

Toxic effects of excess intake

These include weight loss, slow growth, anemia, diarrhea, in- creased blood levels of uric acid and swelling in the joints.

Interactions

Molybdenum competes with copper at absorption sites.

Therapeutic uses of supplements

Supplements have been used to detoxify copper in cases where levels are too high. They have also been used to prevent cancer in areas where the soil content is low.

 
 
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Other Minerals:

Boron
Calcium
Chromium
Cobalt
Copper
Electrolytes
Potassium
Sodium
Chloride
Fluoride
Iodine
Magnesium
Manganese
Molybdenum
Nickel
Phosphorus
Selenium
Silicon
Sulfur
Vanadium
Zinc