Fluoride

Fluoride is not classed as an essential nutrient but because of its strengthening effect on bones and teeth, it is officially considered to be a beneficial element in humans. The use of fluoride in water remains controversial.

Absorption and metabolism

Excess fluoride is excreted in the urine.

FluorideDeficiency

Fluoride deficiency may lead to tooth decay.

Sources

Sources include water, tea, meat, fish, cereals and fruit. The fluoride content of food varies with the location in which the food is grown.

Daily recommended dietary intakes

Men                                            3.8 mg

Women                                       3.1 mg

Children (6 to 12 months)         0.5 mg

Children (4 to 8 years)               1.1 mg

Children (9 to 13 years)             2.0 mg

Toxic effects of excess intake

Toxic effects include mottling of the teeth, dermatitis and bone abnormalities.

Therapeutic uses of supplements

Fluoride supplements have been used to treat tooth decay, osteoporosis and otosclerosis (a loss of hearing due to deposits in the ear). Fluoride supplements may be useful in areas where the water is not fluoridated but, as with water fluoridation, their use is controversial. Sodium fluoride is the least toxic form of fluoride supplement.

 
 
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Fluoride
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Other Minerals:

Boron
Calcium
Chromium
Cobalt
Copper
Electrolytes
Potassium
Sodium
Chloride
Fluoride
Iodine
Magnesium
Manganese
Molybdenum
Nickel
Phosphorus
Selenium
Silicon
Sulfur
Vanadium
Zinc