Copper health

Copper is an essential trace element for humans, animals and many plants. The average adult contains between 75 and 150 mg coppor and about half of this is contained in the skeleton and the muscles. Copper is most concentrated in the brain and liver.

Benefits

Copper is an important component in many enzymes in the body. A copper- containing enzyme plays a vital role in energy production in cells. The activity of this enzyme is highest in the heart, brain, liver and kidney.

Connective tissue formation

An enzyme responsible for the production of the connective tissue proteins, collagen and elastin, requires copper. It is therefore necessary for the development and maintenance of blood vessels, skin, bone and joints.

Iron metabolism and blood

Copper is involved in the release of iron from storage sites and is involved in the formation of bone marrow and the maturation of red blood cells.

Brain and nervous system

Copper health: Copper is necessary for the synthesis of cell membrane phospholipids, and so helps maintain myelin, the insulating sheath that surrounds nerve cells. It also helps regulate neurotransmitter levels.

Antioxidant

Copper is part of the enzyme copper-zinc superoxide dismutase, an antioxidant vital for protection against free radical damage. Maintaining the correct balance between zinc and copper is important in many body functions involving superoxide dismutase.

Immune system

Copper is important in developing resistance to infection. During inflammation or infection, two copper-containing compounds, superoxide dismutase and ceruloplasmin, are mobilized in the body. Copper is also necessary for T cell function and maturation.

Copper healthCardiovascular system

Copper health: Copper is essential for the contractility of heart muscle. It is also necessary for the healthy function of small blood vessels that control blood flow and nutrient and waste exchange. It is also necessary for the functioning of the muscles of the blood vessels and is involved in the functioning of blood vessel linings and platelets which may play a role in blood clotting.

Other functions

T he formation of melanin, a natural coloring pigment found in skin and hair, involves a copper-dependent enzyme. The enzyme histaminase, which metabolizes histamine, requires copper. Copper is involved in fat and cholesterol metabolism and in the normal functioning of insulin which regulates glucose metabolism. It also contributes to the synthesis of prostaglandins, compounds that regulate a variety of functions such as heartbeat, blood pressure and wound- healing.

 
 
Search over 10,000 Natural Remedies and Alternative Medicine Articles

Copper
Copper health
Copper absorption
Copper deficiency
Copper sources
Copper recommended daily
Copper supplements
Copper overdose
Copper interactions

 


 

Other Minerals:

Boron
Calcium
Chromium
Cobalt
Copper
Electrolytes
Potassium
Sodium
Chloride
Fluoride
Iodine
Magnesium
Manganese
Molybdenum
Nickel
Phosphorus
Selenium
Silicon
Sulfur
Vanadium
Zinc